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Here is the current term:  If below it different substantially compared to how it appears in your app/software, be sure to update your software/app's content prior to using this form.
Ratio
In mathematics, a ratio is a relationship between two numbers of the same kind (e.g., objects, persons, students, spoonfuls, units of whatever identical dimension), expressed as "a to b" or a:b, sometimes expressed arithmetically as a dimensionless quotient of the two that explicitly indicates how many times the first number contains the second (not necessarily an integer).

In layman's terms a ratio represents, for every amount of one thing, how much there is of another thing. For example, supposing one has 8 oranges and 6 lemons in a bowl of fruit, the ratio of oranges to lemons would be 4:3 (which is equivalent to 8:6) while the ratio of lemons to oranges would be 3:4. Additionally, the ratio of oranges to the total amount of fruit is 4:7 (equivalent to 8:14). The 4:7 ratio can be further converted to a fraction of 4/7 to represent how much of the fruit is oranges.

The ratio of numbers A and B can be expressed as:

  • the ratio of A to B
  • A is to B (often followed by "as ...")
  • A:B
  • A fraction (rational number) that is the quotient A divided by B: A/B
The numbers A and B are sometimes called terms with A being the antecedent and B being the consequent.

The proportion expressing the equality of the ratios A:B and C:D is written A:B = C:D or A:B::C:D. This latter form, when spoken or written in the English language, is often expressed as

  • A is to B as C is to D.
A, B, C and D are called the terms of the proportion. A and D are called the extremes, and B and C are called the means. The equality of three or more proportions is called a continued proportion.

Ratios are sometimes used with three or more terms. The ratio of the dimensions of a "two by four" that is ten inches long is 2:4:10. A good concrete mix is sometimes quoted as 1:2:4 for the ratio of cement to sand to gravel.

For a mixture of 4/1 cement to water, it could be said that the ratio of cement to water is 4:1, that there is 4 times as much cement as water, or that there is a quarter (1/4) as much water as cement..

Older televisions have a 4:3 aspect ratio, which means that the width is 4/3 of the height; modern widescreen TVs have a 16:9 aspect ratio.

source: Wikitionary / Wikipedia and Related Sources (Edited)
Note
Please do not use this form to tell us that the definition you saw doesn't necessarily match the context where you saw it. We use an automated keyword-based system to match the tens of thousands of definitions in our glossaries with our material. Sometimes, when a term has more than one meaning or use or when an abbreviation might stand for more than one thing or resemble a 'normal' word, this results in a definition for a term being shown that doesn't necessarily match the context. Please do not report such issues here. Rather, please use your best judgment to evaluate whether such definitions apply to what you're reading. If the answer is 'no' but nevertheless you feel the term doen't have a good definition in our system but should, please go back and find the 'suggest a term' link in the app. Thanks!
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